Essential Lectures in Jewish History

Welcome!

The Essential Lectures in Jewish History series is designed to be short and to the point, serving as basic introductions to larger themes in Jewish history that are explored in the Jewish Biographies series.  Enjoy in good health!

1.“They tried to kill us, we survived, let’s eat.”
2. “Two Jews, three opinions:” Jews and Judaism in the Year Zero
3. The Fox in the Ruins: The Roman-Jewish Wars
4. Judaism and the Origins of Christianity
5. The Mishnah: Creating a Portable Judaism
6. Jewish Communal Structure: The Kehilla
7. The Talmud
8. Jews in the Early Muslim Period
9. The Jewish Kingdom of Khazaria
10. The Golden Age of Spanish Jewry
11. The Rishonim
12. Jews in the Medieval Economy
13. The Eastern European Center
14. Medieval Antisemitism
15. Introduction to Modern Jewish History
16. Incipient Revival and Divergence: The Sixteenth Century
17. The Haskalah
18. Origins of Modern Jewish Humor
19. Mass Jewish Politics in the Modern Era
20. Modern Antisemitism
21. Women in Jewish History
22. The Holocaust
23. The Borders of the State of Israel
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17 thoughts on “Essential Lectures in Jewish History

  1. Even as a gentile I find some of these lectures amazing. As a history teacher I’m just astounded by the fluency you have discussing so many eras. Your students are very lucky to have a resource like you. Do keep up the good work with the videos – I love the biographical ones.

  2. Hi
    I just want to give a suggestion
    I see That part of you dévotion to the comunauty is by uploading your class on te web
    It would be a good idea to pût all of you lectures into a google drive wich Will be accessible for thos wich want to Know about your class
    And its very good because That could be download and be listen in a ipod or other mp3 player ( i am a yeshiva bochur…)
    I am ready to help in this important job

  3. I read the recent email about the upcoming lectures on the Jews of Sepharad. What caught my attention were the statistics of Israel’s ‘Sephardic’ demographics, being that they were so high. Perhaps I’m in error, so please correct this notion if I am wrong.. but.. I do believe that, in Israel, the term Sepharadim refers to most any Jew who is not Ashkenazic. However – at least, according to my family’s (proprietary) feelings, being Sephardic is defined by language, that is, by speaking Ladino. Therefore, for example, the Syrians who lived next to us were considered a different type of Jew, one spoke Arabic and French. So, this is just a thought, a feeling.
    Just one more thing: In Israeli schools – at least in the late 50’s – the teaching was, that All Jews decended from the Sephardic migrations of the Inquisition (and, I capitalize that word out of custom, not respect). Your turn.
    (Of course, you don’t have to answer me directily, but I will follow your lectures this fall with much interest.) Lucille

    1. Hello Lucille!

      You’re absolutely right. I would certainly like to include some 19th and 20th century figures who are more accurately described as Mizrahi, so I’m going to emend the title.

      HMA

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