Nathan of Hanover and the Ukrainian Revolution of 1648-1649

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Nathan of Hanover is best known for his moving chronicle of the Khmel’nyts’kyi (Chmielnicki) Rebellion. Entitled Yeven Metsulah (“The Abyss of Despair”), it records with remarkable fairness the social, political, economic and religious background of the mid-17th century Ukrainian movement against the Poles, along with the horrible pogroms perpetrated in the context of that violent era. His analysis of the overall demographic impact of the attacks has been challenged by modern scholarship, but Hanover’s powerful treatment of the martyrdom of Ukrainian Jewry made a powerful impact on Jewish memory for centuries.

Here’s a link to the improved TorahCafe version. Please click on the icon below:

Watch on TorahCafé.com!

3 thoughts on “Nathan of Hanover and the Ukrainian Revolution of 1648-1649

    Sheina said:
    June 4, 2013 at 11:59 am

    At one point in the video, it says “The main source of rebellion was…” and then goes on to discuss the issue of the Orthodox and Catholic, etc.
    Really, the main cause of the uprising was the whole position of the Jews as being the ones who collected the money, etc. So, it was more of an issue of “shoot the messenger”.

    Anonymous said:
    June 14, 2013 at 8:53 am

    It sounds like lecture for children, or all lectures in USA are simply like this?

      Henry Abramson responded:
      June 14, 2013 at 9:53 am

      Hello anonymous–thanks for watching the lecture. I assume from your comment that you didn’t enjoy it (although I can’t be sure–maybe you were actually looking for children’s lectures? I’ll change the tabs). Would you consider writing some more substantive reasons for your critique? That would be helpful.

      Henry Abramson

      P.S. I don’t think all the lectures in the USA are like this. Only the ones in Surfside, Florida.

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